Ap News In Brief At 5:58 A.m. Edt – New Jersey Herald

Kevin Bacon gives ‘The Following’ fans at Comic-Con a chance to be part of his ‘Six Degrees’ SAN DIEGO (AP) – Kevin Bacon’s “Six Degrees” world got even bigger Sunday at Comic-Con. During a Sunday panel for his Fox show “The Following,” a fan brought up the pop culture game known as “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon,” whose premise is anyone in Hollywood can be linked to the actor. She wondered if by talking to him she could then be a part of his universe. Bacon said that technically you need to be in a movie with him to be connected in the “Six Degrees” world. The actor then stood up and took a video of the crowd in the San Diego Convention Center’s 6,500-seat Hall H. He also got laughs when a young girl told him she loved him in the 2011 movie “Crazy Stupid Love.” Virus drugmaker fights back against pediatricians group’s limits on medicine use for preemies CHICAGO (AP) – A costly drug given mostly to premature babies is at the center of a clash between the manufacturer and the nation’s leading pediatrician’s group, which recommends scaling back use of the medicine. The dispute involves new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics, which say medical evidence shows the drug benefits few children other than very young preemies. The medicine guards against a common but usually mild virus that can cause serious lung problems. It’s the second time in two years that the influential group has recommended narrowing use of the drug, sold by MedImmune under the brand name Synagis (SIN’-uh-jis). MedImmune is fighting back with full-page newspaper ads that say the updated policy threatens “our most vulnerable babies.” Synagis protects against RSV, or respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH’-uhl) virus, which infects nearly all U.S. children by the age of 2. For most, it causes only mild, cold-like symptoms. But it is also the most common cause of pneumonia in U.S. infants, and as many as 125,000 young children are hospitalized with RSV each year, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It was approved in 1998 for use in certain “high-risk” children, based on research showing benefits for certain children including premature infants born at 35 weeks or earlier. The pediatricians’ group says it has sought to provide more specific guidance because the government’s definition of high risk is vague.
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